Boynton, Waldron, Doleac, Woodman & Scott, P.A.
603-319-1074

Creative, Experienced Representation since 1920

603-319-1074

Jobs with the most workplace fatalities

Workplace fatalities can happen in any job. An office worker can fall down the stairs and suffer a head injury, even in what appears to be a very low-risk occupation.

That said, some industries certainly carry a greater level of risk than others. Below are a few of the industries with the most annual fatalities.

1. Logging workers

While the ideal image of the lumberjack in early America is nostalgic and layered in myth, the reality is that even modern logging is very difficult and dangerous. According to one report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, for every 100,000 people working full time in the industry, 132.7 die. That's a higher rate than any other industry in the country. Even with that level of risk, the average income for them is $37,590.

2. Fishing professionals

Men and women in the fishing industry have gotten some fame for how dangerous their profession is, as entire television shows have been made about it. While it may not be the most hazardous way to earn a paycheck, it does take an average of 54.8 lives for every 100,000 workers.

3. Airplane pilots

Plane crashes may be relatively uncommon, but pilots and engineers die due to various hazards of their profession. For instance, in addition to crashes, risks include things like falling objects and malfunctioning machinery. For every 100,000 workers, 40.4 are killed.

These may be the three most dangerous jobs, but it is important to remember that injuries and deadly accidents can happen anywhere. Those who are hurt and the families of those who are killed need to know all of their potential rights to compensation.

Source: Lincoln Journal Star, "The 15 most dangerous jobs in the US," accessed April 12, 2018

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
  • AV LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Rated For Ethical Standards and Legal Ability
  • Top-Listed in Best Lawyers The World's Premier Guide